Discussion 1: the military and ptsd

Discussion 1: The Military and PTSD

Gunfire, improvised explosive devices (IED’s), and casualties.

For many military men and women, the actions of war may not be left on the battlefield. Rather, many military men and women may find themselves addressing symptoms of trauma related to their military experience, otherwise known as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As a result for many returning military, the transition into military duty or civilian life may be a complicated process. Additionally, this transition may also influence the significant relationships of military men and women.

For this Discussion, consider how the presentation of PTSD for active duty military might be complicated by military experience. Using the Learning Resources and current literature, consider how PTSD may also affect significant relationships (e.g., family, spouse, and/or significant others).

With these thoughts in mind:

Post by Day 3 an explanation of how the presentation of PTSD for active duty military might be complicated by military experience. Then describe how PTSD might influence a military client’s transition into civilian life. Finally, explain how PTSD of military clients may affect their significant relationships.

Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references to the Learning Resources and current literature.

·         American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.

o    Conditions that May be a Focus of Clinical Attention

o    Sleep-Wake Disorders

o    Other Mental Disorders

·         Paris, J. (2015). The intelligent clinician’s guide to the DSM-5 (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

o    Chapter 15, Other Diagnostic Groupings

·         Fox, J., & Jones, K. (2013). DSM-5 and bereavement: The loss of normal grief? Journal of Counseling & Development91(1), 113–119. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

·         Larson, D. G., & Hoyt, W. T. (2007). What has become of grief counseling? An evaluation of the empirical foundations of the new pessimism. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 38(4), 347–355. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

·         Lorber, W., & Garcia, H. A. (2010). Not supposed to feel this: Traditional masculinity in psychotherapy with male veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research & Practice, 47(3), 296–305. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

·         Sayer, N. A., Noorbaloochi, S., Frazier, P., Carlson, K., Gravely, A., & Murdoch, M. (2010). Reintegration problems and treatment interests among Iraq and Afghanistan combat veterans receiving VA medical care. Psychiatric Services, 61(6), 589–597. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

·         Zisook, S., Corruble, E., Duan, N., Iglewicz, A., Karam, E., Lanuoette, N., & … Young, I. (2012). The bereavement exclusion and DSM-5. Depression & Anxiety (10914269)29(5), 425-443. Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.

 

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