Intergroup bias and dual processing

 

Intergroup Bias and Dual Processing

Research on stereotypes is relatively new; however, it constitutes a sizable body of research with emphasis on stereotype formation, accuracy, measurement, and implications. Stereotypes can be defined as expected traits within a group of people based on some prior knowledge of, or assumptions about, groups of people. Intergroup bias occurs when people categorize traits or people into certain groups, favor groups that are similar to them, and rationalize group traits. While the bias might be outside of one’s cognitive awareness it can nonetheless distort judgment. Consistent with the dual process model discussed early in this course, intergroup bias is the product of both automatic and controlled social cognitive processing and stereotypes can range from subtle to blatant in form (Aronson & McGlone, 2009, p. 154).

For this Discussion, review the media Stereotyping and consider the behavior of the individuals in the scenario. Pay particular attention to how automatic processing and systematic processing might have impacted the stereotype formation presented.

Reference: Aronson, J., & McGlone, M. S. (2009). Stereotype and social identity threat. In T. D. Nelson (Ed.), Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination (pp. 153–178). New York, NY: Psychology Press.

With these thoughts in

 a brief description of one blatant stereotyping behavior and one subtle stereotyping behavior depicted in the media. Then, explain one way automatic processing might have impacted stereotype formation and one way controlled processing might have impacted stereotype formation and how. Finally, as the supervisor in the scenario, explain one way you might mitigate blatant or subtle stereotyping behavior. Use the current literature to support your response. 

 

 

Course Media

  • Media: Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2011). Stereotyping. Baltimore, MD: Author.

    (Click on the television screen once the video opens in a new window. “The Company” will appear on the television image.)

Readings

  • Course Text: Nelson, T. D. (Ed.). (2009). Handbook of prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination. New York, NY: Psychology Press.
    • Chapter 1, “The Study of Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination Within Social Psychology: A Quick History of Theory and Research”
    • Chapter 8, “Stereotype and Social Identity Threat”
  • Article: Banaji, M. R., & Hardin, C. D. (1996). Automatic stereotyping. Psychological Science, 7(3), 136–141. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.
  • Article: Eagly, A. H. (2009). The his and hers of prosocial behavior: An examination of the social psychology of gender. American Psychologist, 64(8), 644–658. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycINFO database.
  • Article: Inzlicht, M., & Kang, S. K. (2010). Stereotype threat spillover: How coping with threats to social identity affects aggression, eating, decision making, and attention. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 99(3), 467-481. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the Business Source Complete database.
  • Article: Plant, E. A., Devine, P. G., Cox, W. T. L., Columb, C., Miller, S. L., Goplen, J., & Peruche, B. M. (2009). The Obama effect: Decreasing implicit prejudice and stereotyping. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45(4), 961–964. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the PsycINFO database.
  • Article: Stone, J., & McWhinnie, C. (2008). Evidence that blatant versus subtle stereotype thread cues impact performance through dual processes. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44(2), 445–452. Retrieved from the Walden Library using the ScienceDirect databas